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Advice for New Runners
Coach Jay
Advice by Topic
Strength Training Routine
Scientific Studies
Advice for New Runners

hipster bigfoot profile for tab pageJosh’s Top Tips

These are the top things I wish I had known when I was starting to run! Many of these worked for me as a Big Dude, but they are fairly universal for all beginning runners. Most of these, unfortunately, I learned the hard way … ๐Ÿ™‚

  1. If you can afford to – hire a running coach when just starting out. You won’t have to pay for the coach forever, and it might save you quite a bit of money in injury prevention. Wondering who to hire? Check out the Road Runners Club of America’s page of local running coaches (link), or spring for somebody incredible like Coach Jay Johnson (link).
  2. Don’t just run! Strengthen your core, back, etc. A great plan for this is Coach Jay’s strength routine (link).
  3. Hit the dirt! Are you a big dude? Help yourself by doing mileage on dirt, grass, and treadmills. Over time this will substantially reduce impact on your body.
  4. Cadence can help form. Learning to run at a cadence of 180 BPM-ish can help your body do a lot of things right. You will still need to work on good form in the long run – but running at 180 BPM can really help. Don’t know what I’m talking about? Look at this article that digs into how to run with better form – and how a high cadence can help form: link.
  5. Don’t do TMTS! Too Much Too Soon kills. Slow down. Listen to your body. Treat running like a marriage, not a hot date!
  6. Find sources of external motivation. Have goals! Sign up for a race! Get a crazy app that tracks your runs or one that pretends zombies are chasing you (this is an actual app!). Ask a friend to run with you! Social pressure ROCKS! Publicize your goals on Facebook. Have 2 friends that you really trust keep you accountable!

(I’m sure that more advice will come, the more I learn!)

– Josh

 

Coach Jay

coach jay_mugCoach Jay Johnson

  1. Professional Coaches Get Paid to Help People Succeed.
  2. Coach Jay is a professional running coach – and a good one at that!
  3. His recommended exercises help prevent injury. Period.

Links to Coach Jay’s routine:

note: I was able to find a couple of the pdfs that show parts of Jay’s routine. But I can’t find pdfs for the whole thing. Perhaps you get the links to them when you sign up for a Nike+ training plan? I found it helpful to print out the pdfs and have them next to me as I did the routine – so I didn’t forget any drills.

  • Here is one for improving a 5k which shows how to incorporate the routine into your daily runs: link.
  • Here is one for Coach Jay’s “myrtl” routine: link.
  • Here is an interview with Coach Jay about his recommendations for incorporating the routine: link.
  • Here is a YouTube playlist demonstrating all of the routines that Coach Jay recommends: link.
Advice by Topic
Strength Training Routine

strength squareGeneral Rules of Strength Training from Coach Jay’s 5k plan:

  1. You build up to doing strength training if you haven’t done it before – or if you’ve taken a break from it as I have. As you begin to implement strength training don’t do pre-run strength training, only post-run. And make sure that you listen to your body. Don’t do “Too Much Too Soon.”
  2. On days when you run, you do strength training. The only exception seems to be if you had a long enough run on the previous day to warrant a break.
  3. As you move in to week three or so, you should be doing some strength training before – and after – your run. Perhaps “Lunges” before and “Myrtl” after … Or “Myrtl” before and after – but you definitely do both “pre” and “post” run strength training.
  4. There is a pattern to strength training. The strength training that Coach Jay does in a fairly regular rotation at the beginning of preparing for a race is: Myrtl (a lot of Myrtl), Back, and Lunge. Gradually, in week 3 and 4, Coach Jay begins to add in Pedestal or Swiss Ball (Medicine Ball) routines.
  5. Pre-run routines seem to be limited to Myrtl and Lunges. Back, Medicine Ball, and Pedestal routines are for post-run training.

My guess is that if you followed these basic patterns you would doing well. You could also just follow Coach Jay’s 5k training plan – which also has tons of variety within the runs to build speed and stamina!

General Rules of Strength Training from Coach Jason Fitzgerald’s great article:

  • Have a routine for “dynamic warm up” – one for “strength training” – and even one if you hurt yourself. All of the routines that Jason recommends can be found here: link.

Does it particularly matter which routine you embrace? Not particularly, but remember: Running coaches across the board agree, “A Strength Training Each Day – Keeps the Doctor Away!”

– Josh

  • Here is a link for improving a 5k which shows how to incorporate the routine into your daily runs: link.
  • Here is an interview with Coach Jay about his recommendations for incorporating the routine: link.
  • Here is a YouTube playlist demonstrating all of the routines that Coach Jay recommends: link.
  • Here is a Vimeo of Coach Jay’s “Cannonball Cool Down” Strength Routine: link.

 

  • Here is a pdf of Coach Jay’s Pedestal Routine: link.
  • Here is a pdf of Coach Jay’s Myrtl Routine: link.
  • Here is a pdf of Coach Jay’s Medicine Ball Routine: link.
  • Here is a pdf of Coach Jay’s Lunge Routine: link.
  • Here is a pdf of Coach Jay’s Back Routine: link.
Scientific Studies

scienceClick on the buttons below to find cited studies on a variety of topics.

Some are “scientific” – some are “anecdotal” – but all of them are interesting!

– Josh